What Controls Your Mood?

 

Do you ever have “just one of those days” in which the darker forces seem to be industriously wreaking havoc in the orderly calm of your life, and even the most trivial incidents are producing rather disagreeable results? The barista made you a lukewarm whole milk latte, although you specifically ordered an extra hot soy latte. How do they even mix that up? You called your sister up to share some good news, but she ended up monopolizing the conversation and complaining about her “unfair” life for forty minutes. Your latest electricity bill is triple the cost of last month’s, so the family will now be banned from touching the thermostat. Regardless of how insignificant or consequential the circumstances of a bad day may be, resist the urge to succumb to moodiness. No amount of spilled coffee, annoying family disputes, or incompliance from your spouse justifies your wallowing in sullen terseness, egocentric vexation, or bitter resentment. Rather than squandering our days self-centeredly focused on our unhappy travails, we must actively pursue a Christ-centered mind. Do not underestimate the value of patience, for Jesus said in Luke 21:19: “By your patience possess your souls” (NKJV). Check out what Oswald Chambers has to say about this issue:

 

“When a man is born again, there is not the same robustness in his thinking or reasoning for a time as formerly. We have to make an expression of the new life, to form the mind of Christ. “acquire your soul with patience.” Many of us prefer to stay at the threshold of the Christian life instead of going on to construct a soul in accordance with the new life God has put within. We fail because we are ignorant of the way we are made, we put things down to the devil instead of our own undisciplined natures. Think what we can be when we are roused!

 

There are certain things we must not pray about – moods, for instance. Moods never go by praying, moods go by kicking. A mood nearly always has its seat in the physical condition, not in the moral. It is a continual effort not to listen to the moods which arise from physical condition; never submit to them for a second. We have to take ourselves by the scruff of the neck and shake ourselves, and we will find that we can do what we said we could not. The curse with most of us is that we won’t. The Christian life is one of incarnate spiritual pluck.”

 

Chambers, Oswald. “November 28.” My Utmost for His Highest. Uhlrichsville, OH: Barbour &, 1997. Print.